Greek like Violin: Day 6 (back to work, and advice for Sunday mornings)

After a break from the training program over the weekend, I was back at it hard today. I did, however, do some reading over the weekend: Romans 5 on Saturday, Romans 6 on Sunday, both in the Greek. Taking that break was key, because I was able to simply read instead of laboring over every word. The reading sessions were actually refreshing, and I feel more at liberty running through the text each time.

Also, if you don’t do it already, you need to start carrying your Biblia Sacra or NA27/28/UBS4 with you to church. Sure, you’re gonna look like a geek (and admit it, you are). But one of the most helpful exercises in language acquisition is letting your eyes fall over the text while somebody is reading audibly. I was able to read through most of 1 Samuel 23 in the Hebrew during the sermon this past Sunday, and picked up a few previously unknown vocab words in the process. Remember, this is a spiritual undertaking, not merely an academic exercise.

greek bible

Here was today’s practice session, which was done later in the afternoon instead of early morning (we got to bed late, and my son woke me up twice during the night):

Devotions:

1420-1435 – Romans 7 in Greek

1435-1505 – Romans 8 in Greek

Practice:

1505-1555 – Wallace – pp. 59-106 (from Nominative of Exclamation through Adjectival Genitive)

1600-1620 – Gamble, “Canonical Formation of the New Testament” in DNTB (Dictionary of New Testament Background)

1625-1650 – Porter – pp. 62-79, “Voice, Number and Person”

1700-1725 – Ruth 2:11-16 (Hebrew followed by LXX. Hebrew readings are obviously much slower than Greek, hence my need to keep working hard at it. I love the language so much I can’t get away from it, no matter how much I try to procrastinate! The biggest obstacle for me at this point is simply vocab. Grammar I feel very good about.)

Summary:

“Greek like Violin” is off to a strong start it’s second week. A good 3-hours of continual, deliberate practice. Tomorrow I work on a movie set all day, which means lots of reading of Westerholm and Porter. Planning on an early wake-up in addition to get into the BibSac.

Keep praying for me as you think of it…

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One comment

  1. Thanks for your valuable tips!
    I will apply to the integrated PhD at Durham next year.
    Perhaps we meet there! LOL
    May God bless you!!

    Like

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